Insect Fridays

A Lantern Bug, photographed at Mulu National Park in Borneo Malaysia

The lantern bug can grow from 1.5 to 3 inches long from head to thorax and has a wingspan of about 2 to 2.5 inches wide, depending on the species. The long “beak” called a rostrum is used to suck the juice out flowers and fruits. The lantern bug is an herbivore. Lantern bugs are called thus because of their bright usually contrasting colors. Their coloring varies for each genus but the colors are bright enough for them to earn their name, despite the fact that no lantern bug actually emits any light at all.

copywrite andythomas 2014

Grey Shrike Thrush

Early last year when I was based at Philip Island, I came across a bird that is renowned for its beautiful song. It is called a Grey Shrike Thrush. A rather drab brown grey colour, but a voice that is sparkling with beauty. I managed to get some nice recordings, and have been working out ways to visualize its song. I wanted the visual structure of this sound to reflect the gum trees that the bird lived in. I like the idea of the natural forms and colours of the gum leaves having an influence on how the sound looks, as though the bird and its call are truly at one with the plants, and how strange it is that a computer is trying to emulate it.

Some stills and influences

copywrite andythomas 2014

main inspiration, gum leaves and trees that the grey shrike thrush lives in.

copywrite andythomas 2014

copywrite andythomas 2014

Heres what the bird looks like

copywrite andythomas 2014

copywrite andythomas 2014

I was also inspired by these shells and coral that i found on the beach near by.

copywrite andythomas 2014

copywrite andythomas 2014

Seaweed, an inspiration for the strands and stringy bits

copywrite andythomas 2014

copywrite andythomas 2014

 

3D Sculptures Volume 1

Continuing with my visual analysis of bird sounds, these are a series of sculptures that seek to visually describe what certain bird sounds would look like. For these I decided, instead of spending a pain staking amount of time on animation, to freeze them in one spot and have the camera pan around them. This frees me up a lot to focus on what the structures actually look like rather than having everything moving in perfect synch. The plan is to make these structures more and more complicated and beautiful while at the same time creating some animated ones that stay more simple and easy to manage. With the hope of one day getting some backing to then make the animated ones as complex as the static ones.